Glasgow: 10 things to do and see in Scotland’s largest city

Glasgow is Scotland’s largest city, situated on the River Clyde, a fascinating port at the heart of Scottish culture, art and music.

Starting from its past as an industrial giant, Glasgow has transformed in recent decades into a exciting and vibrant metropolis where grand Victorian architecture meets the modern bar scene, live music and internationally renowned museums and art galleries.

Glasgow

Glasgow

Exploring the city means discovering building facades, walls and viaducts painted with street art murals like those on the Mural Trail, or discovering the statues in George Square and shopping in Buchanan Street, Argyle Street and Sauchiehall Street or admiring the medieval grandeur of the medieval cathedral. with its stained glass windows.

Glasgow was also the first UNESCO City of Music of the UK and is a hot spot for live entertainment at popular venues such as The Barrowlands and King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut.

To organize the trip to the beautiful Scottish city, you can make it coincide with the annual Glasgow International Comedy Festival or the Pipe Band World Championships.

TO Christmas the city fills with festive traditional markets and ice rinks, the winter holidays bring great performances at iconic venues such as Glasgow’s Royal Concert Hall.

But what are the best unmissable attractions in Glasgow?

Buchanan Street and George Square

Glasgow
Buchanan Street

A sightseeing tour of Glasgow can begin with a stroll down one of the city’s historic streets. Buchanan Street dates back to the late 18th century and is home to a stunning array of Victorian architecture as well as unique shops.

The street runs from the Buchanan Galleries in the north to St. Enoch to the south and is surrounded by squares and arcades, Glasgow Central Station and St. George Tron in the center of Nelson Mandela Place.

A short detour takes you to George Square, Glasgow’s central square, surrounded by elegant Victorian architecture, including the City Chambers and statues of Sir Walter Scott, Robert Burns and Queen Victoria.

Following Queen Street you reach Royal Exchange Square, home to some of Glasgow’s largest public buildings, the Gallery of Modern Art and a famous statue of the Duke of Wellington.

West End

West End
West End

The West End is considered to be Glasgow’s most charming area, thanks to its distinct identity that combines character and beautiful architecture.

Here you will find some of the most beautiful vintage shops and alleys full of small bars and restaurants. The main attractions run along the banks of the River Kelvin, which meanders through the beautiful Botanic Gardens and the trees and statues of Kelvingrove Park.

Kelvingrove Park, dominated by the Gothic towers and turrets of the University of Glasgow, is home to the pride of Glasgow’s civic art and art collection, the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, on Argyle Street.

The hidden lane

The hidden lane
The hidden lane

The Hidden Lane area features a number of colorful buildings in Finnieston that are home to a huge community of artists, designers and musicians.

Located just off the busy Argyle Street, it’s a small creative hub with hundreds of studios, independent businesses, art galleries, yoga centres, craft workshops, bakeries and more for an alternative side of Glasgow.

botanical gardens

Glasgow Botanic Gardens
Glasgow Botanic Gardens

Glasgow Botanic Gardens is an arboretum and public park located to the north of the University and Kelvingrove Art Gallery.

They house several greenhouses, including the remarkable Kibble Palace, recently renovated. The gardens were established in 1817 and managed by the Royal Botanic Institute in Glasgow.

The gardens were originally used for concerts and other events and in 1891 were incorporated into the city’s parks. The gardens have a tea room and are open all year round.

Victorian necropolis

Victorian Necropolis
Victorian Necropolis

Among the places to visit in Glasgow is the Victorian-era Necropolis, the city’s main burial ground from the 17th century onwards.

To discover the stories and legends hidden behind each tombstone, the best way is to take a guided tour.

The Victorian necropolis is located next to the impressive Glasgow Cathedral, one of the oldest buildings in the city.

Glasgow Cathedral

Glasgow Cathedral
Glasgow Cathedral

Glasgow Cathedral is one of the last remaining great cathedrals in the UK.

It is around 800 years old and has one of the largest areas of stained glass of any house of worship, as well as brilliant arches, hand-carved pews and memorabilia dotting every wall.

Barras Market

Bar
Bar

Barras has been a weekend market in Glasgow since the 1920s. Its name comes from the word “barrow” (wheelbarrow) as the original market vendors sold their goods from wheelbarrows.

The market is both indoor and outdoor and offers food, clothing, furniture, antiques and other goods.

Kelvingrove Park

Kelvingrove Park
Kelvingrove Park

To spend a few quiet hours in the city, the right place is Kelvingrove Park, located along the banks of the River Kelvin.

Here you can meet wildlife such as Glasgow’s resident red foxes, as well as students from the nearby university, ordinary people, street performers and families with children who come to enjoy the park’s gardens for picnics on sunny days

People’s Palace and Winter Gardens

People's Palace
People’s Palace

A visit to the People’s Palace offers a glimpse into the lives of Glaswegians over the past three centuries.

The exhibition chronicles the changes in the city and its inhabitants from 1750 onwards after the industrial revolution.

The museum is in the center of Glasgow Green, a large public park which overlooks the River Clyde and also houses the impressive Winter Gardens, a magnificent glass-domed greenhouse full of tropical flora.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum

Kelvingrove Art Gallery, Glasgow
Kelvingrove Gallery

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum has 22 art galleries to explore.

This Victorian-era building is characterized by its rich baroque architecture and is huge in size.

A standout in the main room is the reconstructed skeleton of a Diplodocus dinosaur affectionately nicknamed Dolly.

The journey continues into prehistoric times before learning about Scotland’s first people and the long transition to modern Scotland today. The museum houses a unique array of objects including mummified heads, an Egyptian sarcophagus, a World War II Spitfire fighter plane and more.

The art galleries house some of Europe’s most valuable works of art, including Salvador Dali’s Christ of St. John of the Cross and works by Rembrandt, Monet and Vincent van Gogh.

Riverside Museum

Riverside Museum
Riverside Museum

Another place that symbolizes the soul of Glasgow is the Riverside Museum, where history meets the future in a unique setting.

On the banks of the River Clyde, the Riverside Museum stands on the site of a former shipyard in Glasgow’s redeveloped dockland district and features the signature of renowned architect Zaha Hadid.

Outside the museum, is the Glenlee, a 19th century three-masted sailing ship that sailed around the world and is now preserved in the harbor on the River Clyde and is now part of the Glasgow Transport Museum

Other attractions in Glasgow

The number of attractions to visit in Glasgow is very large, among them we must mention: the Auchentoshan Distillery where you can learn more about the process that takes place to create Scotch Whisky, the Scottish Football Museum housed in the national stadium , Hampden Park , Theater Royal is the oldest theater in Glasgow, Glasgow Science Center built to educate and entertain children, giving them an insight into the world of science and technology, Pollok National Park the only park surrounded by greenery just outside the city

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